There is a strong poetic conceit at the core of this project. By physically replicating processes of glacial rock abrasion as activities for human hands, she calls into question our relationship with time. Preoccupations with productivity and being busy shift in the encounter with a geological process. A number of meticulous processes produce no product but create a conscious passing of time and a space for introspection.

Each process is well conceived and evocatively realised both visually and tactilely. There are resonances with religious and therapeutic practices of making as meditation. I feel that the project hovers on the edge of some wider social and ecological critiques.


Catherine Flood, Curator, V&A Museum of Art and Design, London UK



























Glacial Rock

Manufactured Abrasion

sion
            












A Piece of Broken Shell, ø 1,2 mm








































                             












                              Glacial Striation















“Horizontal Thoughts”, 1970
Sigurður Guðmundsson















Glacial Plane
Hofsjökull, South Iceland



 
                                                                               












Glacial River, Filtration





           




















i

Glacial Ice Cores, Antarctica





             








































                                  
 
 




















Beach